After the Insanity Defense: When the Acquitted Return to the by Matthew F. Shaw

By Matthew F. Shaw

Ebook through Shaw, Matthew F.

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Extra resources for After the Insanity Defense: When the Acquitted Return to the Community (Criminal Justice: Recent Scholarship)

Sample text

For 5 to 10 years, they followed 133 NGRI acquittees released into the community through formal pathways and 15 NGRI acquittees who escaped from the hospital. 0%) were re-arrested. These results were considered discouraging given that patients who escaped, and therefore were largely untreated, appeared to be less recidivistic than offenders who moved through the normal treatment and release pathways. Since the reasons for this unexpected finding were not addressed empirically, one is left to offer hypotheses.

There was a great deal of variability among the rates of recidivism calculated in the twenty studies (see Table 3). In the majority of studies, between NGRI Research Programs 31 15 to 40% of subjects recidivated. However, there were many examples of recidivism rates outside of this range. In Hawaii, Bogenberger and colleagues found that nearly 68% of the 107 acquittees they followed recidivated. At the lower limit, Cavanaugh and colleagues found that less than 5% of their 44 subjects in Illinois recidivated.

These changes in scope would be sufficient justification for conducting another study; however, they also performed an intra-group NGRI Research Programs 29 comparison. For 5 to 10 years, they followed 133 NGRI acquittees released into the community through formal pathways and 15 NGRI acquittees who escaped from the hospital. 0%) were re-arrested. These results were considered discouraging given that patients who escaped, and therefore were largely untreated, appeared to be less recidivistic than offenders who moved through the normal treatment and release pathways.

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