A Comprehensive Guide to the Hazardous Properties of by Pradyot Patnaik

By Pradyot Patnaik

The definitive consultant to the detrimental houses of chemical compounds

Correlating chemical constitution with toxicity to people and the surroundings, and the chemical constitution of compounds to their detrimental houses, A complete advisor to the unsafe homes of chemical compounds, 3rd Edition permits clients to evaluate the toxicity of a substance even if no experimental information exists. hence, it bridges the distance among dangerous fabrics and chemistry. broadly up-to-date and multiplied, this reference:

  • Examines organics, metals and inorganics, business solvents, universal gases, particulates, explosives, and radioactive components, overlaying every thing from toxicity and carcinogenicity to flammability and explosive reactivity to dealing with and disposal practices
  • Arranges dangerous chemicals in accordance with their chemical buildings and practical teams for simple reference
  • comprises up-to-date info at the poisonous, flammable, and explosive homes of chemical compounds
  • Covers extra metals within the chapters on poisonous and reactive metals
  • Updates the edge publicity limits within the place of work air for a couple of elements
  • positive factors the newest info on commercial solvents and poisonous and flammable gases
  • contains a number of tables, formulation, and a word list for fast reference

since it offers details that permits people with a chemistry history to accomplish tests with no previous info, this accomplished reference appeals to chemists, chemical engineers, toxicologists, and forensic scientists, in addition to commercial hygienists, occupational physicians, Hazmat execs, and others in comparable fields.Content:
Chapter 1 Acids, Carboxylic (pages 103–114):
Chapter 2 Acids, Mineral (pages 115–126):
Chapter three Acids, Peroxy (pages 127–133):
Chapter four Alcohols (pages 134–159):
Chapter five Aldehydes (pages 160–192):
Chapter 6 Alkalies (pages 193–199):
Chapter 7 Alkaloids (pages 200–234):
Chapter eight Amines, Aliphatic (pages 235–250):
Chapter nine Amines, fragrant (pages 251–268):
Chapter 10 Asbestos (pages 269–276):
Chapter eleven Azo Dyes (pages 277–285):
Chapter 12 Chlorohydrins (pages 286–293):
Chapter thirteen Cyanides, natural (Nitriles) (pages 294–316):
Chapter 14 Cyanides, Inorganic (pages 317–335):
Chapter 15 Dioxin and comparable Compounds (pages 336–347):
Chapter sixteen Epoxy Compounds (pages 348–369):
Chapter 17 Esters (pages 370–389):
Chapter 18 Ethers (pages 390–401):
Chapter 19 Gases, universal poisonous, and Flammable (pages 402–409):
Chapter 20 Glycol Ethers (pages 410–424):
Chapter 21 Haloethers (pages 425–437):
Chapter 22 Halogenated Hydrocarbons (pages 438–469):
Chapter 23 Halogens, Halogen Oxides, and Interhalogen Compounds (pages 470–483):
Chapter 24 Heterocyclic Compounds (pages 484–495):
Chapter 25 Hydrocarbons, Aliphatic and Alicyclic (pages 496–515):
Chapter 26 Hydrocarbons, fragrant (pages 516–536):
Chapter 27 business Solvents (pages 537–550):
Chapter 28 Isocyanates, natural (pages 551–567):
Chapter 29 Ketones (pages 568–591):
Chapter 30 steel Acetylides and Fulminates (pages 592–597):
Chapter 31 steel Alkoxides (pages 598–601):
Chapter 32 steel Alkyls (pages 602–612):
Chapter 33 steel Azides (pages 613–621):
Chapter 34 steel Carbonyls (pages 622–629):
Chapter 35 steel Hydrides (pages 630–642):
Chapter 36 Metals, Reactive (pages 643–649):
Chapter 37 Metals, poisonous (pages 650–668):
Chapter 38 Mustard fuel and Sulfur Mustards (pages 669–673):
Chapter 39 Nerve Gases (pages 674–690):
Chapter forty Nitro Explosives (pages 691–703):
Chapter forty-one Oxidizers (pages 704–714):
Chapter forty two Particulates (pages 715–718):
Chapter forty three Peroxides, natural (pages 719–740):
Chapter forty four insecticides and Herbicides: class, constitution, and research (pages 741–745):
Chapter forty five insecticides, Carbamate (pages 746–761):
Chapter forty six insecticides, Organochlorine (pages 762–781):
Chapter forty seven insecticides, Organophosphorus (pages 782–803):
Chapter forty eight Herbicides, Chlorophenoxy Acid (pages 804–810):
Chapter forty nine Herbicides, Triazine (pages 811–816):
Chapter 50 Herbicides, Urea (pages 817–820):
Chapter fifty one Phenols (pages 821–833):
Chapter fifty two Phosphorus and Its Compounds (pages 834–853):
Chapter fifty three Polychlorinated Biphenyls (pages 854–862):
Chapter fifty four Radon and Radioactive elements (pages 863–866):
Chapter fifty five Sulfate Esters (pages 867–871):
Chapter fifty six Sulfur?Containing Organics (Miscellaneous) (pages 872–881):
Chapter fifty seven Miscellaneous ingredients (pages 882–898):

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Extra info for A Comprehensive Guide to the Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances, (3rd) Third Edition

Sample text

The mode of actions of immunotoxicants are wide, showing a variety of effects. These include immunosuppression, immunodysfunction, and autoimmunity. Some immunotoxicants suppress all the specific immune functions by binding to the Ah receptors on lymphoid cells. Highly toxic dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) is an example of such toxicants. However, most immunotoxicants exhibit more restricted activities. For example, some heavy metals, such as lead and mercury, suppress humoral and cell-mediated host resistance.

Highly water-reactive substances such as bromine pentafluoride or other interhalogen compounds can burn the skin. Among the organic compounds, toxicity shows a general pattern of decrease with an increase in the carbon chain length. However, such a pattern is manifested above carbon 6 or 7 (C-6 or C-7) for many classes of compounds. Below carbon 6 (C-6), certain substances, such as aliphatic esters, show enhanced toxicity with an increase in the carbon chain length. Thus n-amyl or n-butyl acetates are more toxic than ethyl or n-propyl acetates.

However, such a pattern is manifested above carbon 6 or 7 (C-6 or C-7) for many classes of compounds. Below carbon 6 (C-6), certain substances, such as aliphatic esters, show enhanced toxicity with an increase in the carbon chain length. Thus n-amyl or n-butyl acetates are more toxic than ethyl or n-propyl acetates. The first members of certain classes 25 of compounds show the highest toxicity. Ethylene oxide formaldehyde, or formic acid are more toxic than are other members of their families. In a few instances, certain toxic properties exhibited by the first member of a group are not displayed by other members in the same group.

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